David English[1]

Male 1769 - 1856  (86 years)


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  • Name David English 
    Born 23 Apr 1769  English Town, New Jersey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 14 May 1769  Tennant, Monmouth, New Jersey Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    AFN WLW7-6X 
    _UID D287688E3C09D511A5C1205002C100001317 
    Died 30 Mar 1856  Jefferson county, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I298  Scudder
    Last Modified 30 Sep 2011 

    Family Lydia Scudder,   b. 27 Oct 1767, Monmouth county, New Jersey Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Mar 1800, New Jersey Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 32 years) 
    Married 14 Oct 1796  Monmouth county, New Jersey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 1986688E3C09D511A5C1205002C100005978 
    Last Modified 7 Dec 2017 
    Family ID F77  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • David was christened in the old Scotch Presbyterian Church. He graduated from Princeton College and later became the president of the Bank of Georgetown.

      For two years, David took charge of an academy at Basking Ridge, New Jersey, which had been established by his friend the Reverend Robert Finley. In 1791, he went south and secured a position as tutor in the family of Mr. Taney, a wealthy planter in Calvert County, Maryland. One of his pupils was Roger Brooke Taney, afterward Chief Justice of the United States. The chief justice remembered him with respect and admiration. Mr. English was tutor at Princeton from 1794 to 1796. He was capable, affable, and made firm friendships with many of the students.

      In 1796 David went to Georgetown, District of Columbia, which he made his home. Soon after his arrival, he commenced the publication, 24 May 1796, in company with his friend Mr. Green, of a weekly newspaper, which he styled ''The Sentinel of Liberty.'' It had a prosperous career for several years. After engaging in mercantile pursuits, he was made in 1811 cashier of the Union Bank, and continued in that position until its liquidation in 1849. He retained through his life his love of literature and the classics. He was a firm and consistent member and a ruling elder of the Presbyterian Church, known as the Bridge Street Church.

  • Sources 
    1. [S19] Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania, Genealogical and Personal Memoirs, Wilfred Jordan; ed., (New York: Lewis Historical Pub. Co., Inc., 1939), Vol. 8, p. 45.

    2. [S841] International Genealogical Index (R), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of December 5, 2004), Film #: 1239623, Ref #: 11865, Page #: 319.