Samuel Scudder

Samuel Scudder[1]

Male Abt 1643 - 1689  (~ 46 years)

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  • Name Samuel Scudder 
    Born Abt 1643  Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    AFN H1N0-81 
    _UID 9A95688E3C09D511A5C1205002C10000E969 
    Died Nov 1688/1689  Newtown, Queens, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I2062  Scudder
    Last Modified 20 Apr 2013 

    Father John Scudder,   b. 1616/1620, London, Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 6 Jan 1685, Newtown, Queens, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age < 65 years) 
    Mother Mary King,   b. Abt 1623, Suffolk, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Jan 1668, Newtown, Queens, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 45 years) 
    Married 1642  Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    _UID AF8D688E3C09D511A5C1205002C10000F641 
    Family ID F1048  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Phebe Titus,   b. Jan 1660, Westbury, Nassau, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Mar 1742, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 82 years) 
    Married 1680  New York Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    _UID BF8D688E3C09D511A5C1205002C100000641 
    Children 
     1. Samuel Scudder,   b. Abt 1689, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Aug 1764, Newtown, Queens, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 75 years)
     2. Sarah Scudder,   b. 1684, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. DECEASED
    Last Modified 7 Dec 2017 
    Family ID F1056  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Quaker meeting.jpg
    Quaker meeting.jpg

  • Notes 
    • Newtown, where Samuel and his brother, and later his parents, lived, had been founded about 1652 by a group of English settlers who had moved from New England. They established a new town at the site of an English attempt nine years earlier by a minister named Francis Doughty, who had been chased out of Massachusetts because of his radical preaching. The Dutch director-general of New Amsterdam, Willem Kieft, who was searching for settlers for western Long Island, gave Reverend Doughty about 6,000 acres and the right to preach Doughty's chosen gospel. In 1642, Doughty brought several families to his new commuity, called Maspeth.

      The newcomers had just begun their settlement when an Indian attack leveled the place in 1643. This was the site of the new town begun by another group of New England settlers. They named the place Middleburgh. With the English takeover of New Netherland in 1664, the name was changed to Hastings. However, the residents had been calling the place New Town, as if to distinquish it from the earlier Doughty attempt. This name was kept until well into the nineteenth century. The name again became Maspeth, in the borough of Queens. The name of Newtown can be found only today in the name of Newtown Avenue and Newtown Creek.

      Samuel became a Quaker activist, a disciple of Thomas Case of Newtown, whose conduct was at one time declared a disturbance of the peace and a public scandal. Case and Samuel were called before Justice Betts, the father-in-law of Samuel's brother, John, on 15 June 1675 at the Court of Sessions, Gravesend. They were charged with disturbing and seducing the people. Case was fined £20, and Samuel, who admitted to having written a scandalous letter to a local Presbyterian minister, was fined £6 or two months imprisonment. He was also required to post another £20 as security for his future good behavior.

      The Quakers, a religous sect founded in England, began coming to Massachusetts in 1656. They refused to take an oath and many thought them Jesuits in disguise. Reports of their extreme fanaticism had reached the colonists, and the first arrivals were sent back. Laws were then enacted to prohibit their coming, but they came in defiance of the laws. At length a law was passed pronouncing the death sentence upon any Quaker who having been once banished, should return to the colony. To the astonishment of all, a few of the banished ones returned and demanded the repeal of the cruel law. Their fanaticism increased with the persecution; they walked the streets and entered the churches naked, denouncing the laws and the Puritan form of worship. The authorities were perplexed. They had not expected to have occasion to enforce their harsh law; they had only meant to keep out people whom they despised. But now they must actually put these people to death or yield to their demand and repeal the law. They met in solemn conclave and again decided by one majority to enforce the law. Four of the Quakers were hanged.

      But public opinion did not sustain the magistrates and the law was repealed. Thus the Quakers, by sacrificing a few lives, won a victory, and they eventually settled down and became quiet, useful citizens, devoting much of their energy to the conversion of the Indians.

      On 13 December 1680, Samuel's father gave Samuel his estate in exchange for the maintenance of himself and Samuel's mother for the remainder of their lives. The arrangement would have been mutually beneficial. Samuel gained property and the means of supporting his family; and the parents the opportunity to care for, and perhaps spoil, any grandchildren, which might appear. It was about this time that Samuel married Phoebe Titus.

      At a Newton town meeting on 6 January 1685/86, Samuel was chosen one of nine prominent residents to draft a new town patent for Newtown to be provided to the New York governor. Another of these prominent men chosen was Captain Richard Betts, the father of Samuel's sister-in-law.

  • Sources 
    1. [S247] Ancestral File (R), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998).

    2. [S6] Scudder Family in America: The Beginnings, Scudder, David B., comp., (Scudder Searches), Vol. I, No. 2, p. 9.