Carl Enos Nash

Carl Enos Nash

Male 1875 - 1959  (84 years)

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  • Name Carl Enos Nash 
    Born 31 Jan 1875  Clinton, Clinton, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Census 1880  Beloit, Mitchell, Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID F686688E3C09D511A5C1205002C100003648 
    Died 16 Feb 1959  Pasadena, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Pasadena, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I188  Scudder
    Last Modified 25 Jul 2005 

    Family Katherine Hind Scudder,   b. 12 Nov 1874, St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Mar 1966, Pasadena, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years) 
    Married 25 Jun 1903  Pasadena, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    _UID C985688E3C09D511A5C1205002C100000869 
    Children 
     1. Carl Scudder Nash,   b. 8 Jun 1905, Pasadena, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jan 2004, Altadena, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 98 years)
     2. Virginia Louise Nash,   b. 21 Jun 1910, Pasadena, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Sep 2012  (Age 102 years)
    Last Modified 7 Dec 2017 
    Family ID F37  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Nash, Carl E.jpg
    Nash, Carl E.jpg

  • Notes 
    • The cavernous stone hearth of the Mount Lowe Alpine Tavern was illustrated in a 1909 House and Garden article on modern fireplaces that captured the old-fashioned home spirit of the colonial or preindustrial kitchen and living hall. Also featured in the article were a floor-to-ceiling rough clinker-brick model from the Los Angeles mail-order bungalow builder Henry L. Wilson and a Craftsman-like affair of tile, wood buttresses, and beams framing an overmantel mountain landscape. The latter fireplace treatment was the work of Carl Enos Nash's company, "artists as well as craftsmen," who favored scenic, matte-glazed Grueby and Rookwood tiles depicting forest, desert, and pastoral motifs in keeping with the bungalow's mission to maximize the charms of outdoor life. The living-room hearth was the most important emblem of the devoted though informal home life advocated by Charles Keeler and numerous reformer-idealists associated with the Arts and Crafts movement. Nash articulated this linkage between material environment and spiritual state: "As we sit meditating, watching the leaping flames and listening to the crackle of the fire, what can be more conducive to perfect contentment than a well designed fireplace?"

  • Sources 
    1. [S545] 1880 United States Census, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (Copyright (c) 2000, 2002 FamilySearch (TM) Internet Genealogy Service, November 21, 2002), FHL Film 1254389; National Archives Film T9-0389; Page 96D.

    2. [S9] Letter, Edwin Soper to Christopher Scudder, Edwin Soper, (letter, 31 May 1982).