Thomas Scudder[1]

Male Abt 1626 - 1690  (~ 64 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Thomas Scudder 
    Born Abt 1622/1626  Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened May 1622/1626 
    Gender Male 
    AFN 2PVP-18 
    Reference Number 512 
    _UID C686688E3C09D511A5C1205002C100000648 
    Died 14 Nov 1690  Huntington, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Person ID I164  Scudder
    Last Modified 17 Nov 2016 

    Father Thomas Scudder,   b. 1586/1591, Horton Kirby, Darenth, Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 30 Sep 1657, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 66 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth,   b. Abt 1590, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Sep 1666, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 76 years) 
    Married Abt 1610  England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 6F86688E3C09D511A5C1205002C10000AFD8 
    Family ID F120  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary Ludlam,   b. Abt 1625, Matlock, Derbyshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1690, Huntington, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 65 years) 
    Married Abt 1655  Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    _UID 6D86688E3C09D511A5C1205002C10000ADB8 
    Children 
     1. Isaac Scudder,   b. 10 Oct 1657, Southhold, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. without issue
     2. Elizabeth Scudder,   b. Abt 1658/1662, Huntington, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. New York Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Mary Scudder,   b. Abt 1662/1668, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1730, Suffolk county, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 62 years)
     4. Timothy Scudder,   b. Abt 1668/1672, Southold, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1740, Crabmeadow, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 68 years)
     5. Sarah Scudder,   b. 16 Dec 1670, Huntington, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Aug 1753, Southold, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     6. Benjamin Scudder,   b. Abt 1672, Huntington, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 21 Oct 1739, Huntington, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 67 years)
     7. Clemans Scudder,   b. Abt 1678, Huntington, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1700, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 22 years)
     8. Mercy Scudder,   b. Abt 1680, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1695, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 15 years)
    Last Modified 7 Dec 2017 
    Family ID F119  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • According to Southhold, Long Island, records, Thomas owned land there in 1654. He sold it in 1656 to move, apparently spending a year or more in Babylon, Long Island, before settling in Huntington. In 1668, Thomas was chosen Town Constable. He settled "by the waterside" of Huntington Bay, possibly on the site of the "Old House at the Inlet" near the junction of present New York and Park avenues, Huntington. In 17 October 1660, he brought suit for £100 against Edward Higby for defamation of character. Thomas won the suit but received only £20 in damages.

      In 1673, Suffolk county and the rest of Long Island came back under the control of the Dutch. Those areas where the population was heavily Dutch, including western Long Island, quickly and enthusiastically fell in with their new rulers. But the East End towns dug in their heels. They looked for help from Connecticut, where Gov. John Winthrop in Hartford had long been looking for an opportunity to bring the East End under his control.

      The Dutch in New Orange were now claiming all of Long Island, and they made it clear that they expected the townspeople to sign an oath of loyalty to the new government. The East End towns refused.

      On 31 October 1673, three new commissioners, led by Cornelis Steenwyck, were sent to the East Riding, this time in the "Zeehond," a speedy, shallow-draft warship whose intention was to intimidate rather than do battle. When they arrived at Southold, they were met by cavalry and hostile citizens with muskets. As they were leaving Southold on their way to Southampton, the Dutch commissioners were met by an angry group led by John Cooper of Southampton.

      Steenwyck and his fellow commissioners heeded Cooper's warning and headed back to New Orange to report to Governor General Anthony Colve. The following February, the "Zeehond" was back at Southold, this time accompanied by two other warships. They came with a message to the town and to Governor Winthrop, demanding ``subjection'' to the Netherlands and the prince of Orange. Refusal would bring swift and total destruction. The Southolders, along with Winthrop's representatives, quickly refused.

      The "Zeehond" opened fire with cannonballs. ``The English quickly replied in kind, the ball splashing harmlessly in the water near the bow,'' Shomette said. ``Then commenced a flurry of small-arms fire from both sides, accentuated now and then by cannon. The Dutch fire, which fell thick upon the English, however, did no damage, and the English fire accomplished little more than splinter the sides of the warship.''

      The Battle of Southold was over. The Dutch, deciding not to press the issue, raised anchors and sailed away for New Orange. ``The Battle of Southold was to be the high water mark of Dutch efforts over the East Riding towns of Long Island, indeed, of the last days of the Dutch empire on the American continent,'' Shomette said.

      As winter turned into spring, there were rumors of peace in the air. As part of the Treaty of Westminster, New Netherland was handed back to England on 10 November 1674. The English had learned their lesson during the 14-month interregnum.

      Thomas built the first tanning mills in the town. They faced the water in the area now called Tanyard Lane. Leather was cured and sent by wagon to a drum factory on Rogues Path to be transformed into drums for military use all over the world.

      Over a period of time, Thomas acquired some one thousand acres of land, including land previously acquired in Babylon. Much of the land was along the Huntington Bay waterside, but some extended well up into the hills from the shore. He also purchased land eastward to Cow Harbor and Crabmeadow (now Northport).

      Thomas and Mary had a total of eight known children. In his will, dated 2 December 1686, he left most of his real and personal property to be divided equally between his widow, Mary, and his third son, Benjamin. To his oldest son, Timothy, he left valuable property at Babylon, Cow Harbor (North Point), Red Hook (Vernon Valley), and at Crabmeadow (Northport).

      According to Southhold, Long Island, records, Thomas owned land there in 1654. He sold it in 1656 to move, apparently spending a year or more in Babylon, Long Island, before settling in Huntington. In 1668, Thomas was chosen Town Constable. He settled "by the waterside" of Huntington Bay, possibly on the site of the "Old House at the Inlet" near the junction of present New York and Park avenues, Huntington. In 17 October 1660, he brought suit for £100 against Edward Higby for defamation of character. Thomas won the suit but received only £20 in damages.

  • Sources 
    1. [S267] Town of Southhold, Charles Moore, (New York: n.pub., 1868), p. 36.

    2. [S135] Early Long Island Wills of Suffolk County, 1691-1703, William S. Pelletreau, comp., (New York: Francis P. Harper, 1897), pp. 46-49.

    3. [S125] The Story of Our Butler Ancestors, Henry Langdon Butler, comp., (New York: n.pub., 1919), ancestry chart.

    4. [S123] Colonial Families of Long Island, New York and Connecticut, Being the Ancestry of Kindred of Herbert Furman Seversmith, Herbert Furman Seversmith, comp., (rev. rpt. 1944; Washington: n.pub., 1959), vol. 4, p. 1893.