Sarah Kip[1]

Female 1755 - Aft 1830  (> 76 years)


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  • Name Sarah Kip 
    Born 9 Mar 1755  New York City, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    _UID CDC5688E3C09D511A5C1205002C100004C69 
    Died Aft 1830  Greenbriar county, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I10037  Scudder
    Last Modified 8 May 2013 

    Family Colonel William Scudder,   b. 25 Jul 1747, Westfield, Essex, New Jersey Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Oct 1798, Manhattan, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years) 
    Married 21 Apr 1792  New York City, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Married Reformed Dutch Church Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 0DA21B3C8D43214A9C773DA187D55A452D7D 
    Children 
     1. Sarah Ogden Kip Scudder,   b. 1794,   d. 27 May 1880, New York City, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
     2. William Kip Scudder,   b. 10 Jul 1798, New York City, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jul 1884, Clintonville, Greenbrier, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
    Last Modified 7 Dec 2017 
    Family ID F8551  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • After William Scudder's death, and left with two young children, Sarah was fortunate to be in New York City, where she had the support of family members. Sarah's brother, James, a brass founder, had a business on Broadway. Her brother, Richard Kip, an upholsterer by trade, had a shop at Hanover Square in New York City; and her sister's husband, Daniel Ebbets, was a well-respected New York merchant in the fine china and glass firm of Ebbets & Gale. After the turn of the century, Daniel Ebbets was commissioned by the City Council to lay out Canal Street in Manhattan. Today that street borders Chinatown and Little Italy and stands near the entrance to the Holland Tunnel on the West and at the Manhattan Bridge on the East.

      Financially, these were difficult times for Sarah. In spite of William Scudder's distinguished ranking during the Revolution, and regardless of his membership in the elite Society of the Cincinnati, the inventory of his estate only amounted to some forty dollars. In order to pay off his debts, Sarah had to appeal to the court to sell property in Onondaga, New York, to which William Scudder held title. She received aid from the Society of the Cincinnati fund. Sarah took on jobs as a teacher and a seamstress, while Asa started up a business making and repairing saddles, and her son, Joseph, worked at a boarding house.

      In December 1819, Sarah, along with her son, William, and her daughter, Sarah, and son-in-law, first contracted to sell 150 acres of land in (West) Virginia. Her son, Joseph, witnessed the document on the sale of the tract of land, which was part of the 5,590 acres that Lt. William Scudder had purchased in 1791 while living in Orange County, New York.

  • Sources 
    1. [S95] John Scudder III (1675-1738) of Essex County, New Jersey, David B. Scudder; comp, (Scudder Searches), Vol. II, No. 1, p. 5, Winter 1990.

    2. [S400] Email from Diane Benelli, 1 January 2001, Benelli, Diane Crane, comp. .
      Compiler cites "Marriages from 1639 to 1801 in the Reformed Dutch Church - New Amsterdam, New York City," Collections of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, Volume IX, pp. 242, 266.